Huy: I don’t think we could have asked for a better situation to raise a baby. We got to see him grow up. Our expenses are a lot less, just living at home. We got to keep our salaries at the same level. Not many people in the country have this luxury.


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Part of the silver lining to the pandemic is that we get to work from home. With my flexible schedule, I was able to dive into other hobbies. One of them was day trading. I did, like, 20 trades a day. I’m trying to step back now and take it slower, because with our kid, ever since he was born, I realized I wasn’t really spending as much time with him, and I couldn’t just trade from 6:30 to 1 p.m. I thought to myself, What am I doing?

My paternity leave started in mid-March and goes until the end of May. I really enjoy cuddling with him after I feed him. There’s something about just being able to hold him. Play time, he’s usually more active, squirrelly. Changing the diapers — that’s where we share responsibility. Not necessarily the pee diapers, but when he actually poops and there’s accidents where it goes all over the clothes and everything, that’s when I typically ask Brittany if she can handle some of it, because it just grosses me out a little too much.

My mom was very big on saving. I’m not sure if it’s because she’s an immigrant — she immigrated from Vietnam during the war. Anytime we wanted to buy anything she would ask us, “Oh, do you really need it?” Sometimes it’s more about waste. Using the baby as an example, do we need to buy, like, five different toys when we don’t even know if he’s going to enjoy them?

With the tax deadline coming up, we’ve been saving up more money in order to pay off our capital-gains tax from my stock trading last year. I’m making that up by reducing our retirement contributions.

As for the vaccine, we got our first shot last week. Brittany messaged our friends and asked, “Hey, do you want to hang out and see Ezra for the first time?” Something I’m looking forward to: Our favorite restaurant is in San Mateo. It’s called Taishoken, and it’s ramen noodles, and that’s one of the things that you have to have fresh. It’s not the same taking it to go.

Part of the silver lining to the pandemic is that we get to work from home. With my flexible schedule, I was able to dive into other hobbies. One of them was day trading. I did, like, 20 trades a day. I’m trying to step back now and take it slower, because with our kid, ever since he was born, I realized I wasn’t really spending as much time with him, and I couldn’t just trade from 6:30 to 1 p.m. I thought to myself, What am I doing?

My paternity leave started in mid-March and goes until the end of May. I really enjoy cuddling with him after I feed him. There’s something about just being able to hold him. Play time, he’s usually more active, squirrelly. Changing the diapers — that’s where we share responsibility. Not necessarily the pee diapers, but when he actually poops and there’s accidents where it goes all over the clothes and everything, that’s when I typically ask Brittany if she can handle some of it, because it just grosses me out a little too much.

My mom was very big on saving. I’m not sure if it’s because she’s an immigrant — she immigrated from Vietnam during the war. Anytime we wanted to buy anything she would ask us, “Oh, do you really need it?” Sometimes it’s more about waste. Using the baby as an example, do we need to buy, like, five different toys when we don’t even know if he’s going to enjoy them?

With the tax deadline coming up, we’ve been saving up more money in order to pay off our capital-gains tax from my stock trading last year. I’m making that up by reducing our retirement contributions.

As for the vaccine, we got our first shot last week. Brittany messaged our friends and asked, “Hey, do you want to hang out and see Ezra for the first time?” Something I’m looking forward to: Our favorite restaurant is in San Mateo. It’s called Taishoken, and it’s ramen noodles, and that’s one of the things that you have to have fresh. It’s not the same taking it to go.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/05/18/magazine/money-diaries.html